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Does Ethernet over Power Lines work well for home networking?

Does Ethernet over Power Lines work well for home networking?

I am considering putting a computer in my garage (geek alert) and my wireless signal is simply to weak to get through all of the concrete, steel, etc.

Asked by: Guest | Views: 34
Total answers/comments: 4
Guest [Entry]

"I have one of those (or at least, something similar made by Netgear), and it's a bit of a hit and miss. When it works, it works well. You don't get full gigabit speeds, but it's still faster and more reliable than wireless.

On the other hand, it doesn't seem to work in every room. Some rooms just won't allow it to find its buddy which is hooked up to the router. I would go ahead and try it - when it works it's great - just make sure you can return it easily in case it doesn't work."
Guest [Entry]

"Powerline Ethernet works well in most homes. Be sure to purchase the latest standard - HomePlug AV rated at 200Mpbs PHY. This standard handles a variety of home wiring much more effectively. By the way, PHY is the raw data rate over the wires. Accounting for error correction and other overhead, the corresponding Ethernet rate is about 100Mbps maximum. Of course, depending on the wiring in your house, your mileage may vary. Using HomePlug AV, you can usually expect something in the 40 to 60 Mbps range for most circuits.

One of the challenges with powerline solutions is that you don't have an easy way to determine how good the powerline links are (in other words, their capacity/speed). I found a solution from Plaster Networks that provides a really easy way to check the performance to any of the powerline adapters in your house - very helpful for troubleshooting especially for larger homes, homes with older wiring, etc. The troubleshooting tools are built right into the adapters."
Guest [Entry]

"I'm not a tech whiz, but I am having issues with Ethernet or power also. In talking to an electrician, he stated that these units work best if they are both connected to the same 110v leg of the inbound power. electrical power coming in arrives with two 110v legs, and a ground. To get 220v, the two legs are then used are used with the ground. As the 60 cycle current is opposite in each leg, the development of 220v takes place. The lights and 110v sockets are divided as equally as possible based on the balancing of the load requirements.
Thus , if the Ethernet power transmitter and receiver are on two separate legs, you may have slowness. This also pertains to the x-10 transmitters and receivers."
Guest [Entry]

These things completely wiped out my radio reception from about 3 to 20 MHz. This won't bother most people but as a ham operator it was completely unacceptable to me. And I don't understand how the FCC approved these things when they put out so much RFI.