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How can I find the IP address of my client bridge router?

How can I find the IP address of my client bridge router?

I have a client bridge (LinkSys WRT54GL router with DD-WRT firmware). I specified an IP address of 192.168.1.2 for the device, however, when I run ipconfig, the default gateway is now 192.168.0.1. Similarly, when I try to connect to http://192.168.1.2, I can't access the administrative page for the router.

Asked by: Guest | Views: 87
Total answers/comments: 3
Guest [Entry]

"You can force the settings of the default gateway in your adapter properties.

Is it possible that you still have this set from how your previous connection was set up?"
Guest [Entry]

"How to find the lost IP address of a wireless bridge:

If you have Linux, nmap will solve your problem. nmap will scan all your IP addresses for responding ones.

Suppose you know that the ip address is somewhere around 192.168.13.1 --> 192.168.13.150. But you are not sure which one it is. This will greatly shrink your search space.

Install nmap on the linux

[root@defiant bin]# yum install nmap
Package 2:nmap-6.01-4.fc17.x86_64 already installed and latest version

Run the nmap command:

nmap -sP 192.168.13.80-140

Understand the above nmap command:

The -sP flag tells nmap to (not search ports) after a host is discovered. The 80-140 token at the end of the ip address means scan for ip addresses 192.168.13.80 through 192.168.13.140.

nmap command produces output:

Starting Nmap 6.01 ( http://nmapdotorg ) at 2013-08-04 23:12 EDT
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.84
Host is up (0.00019s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.99
Host is up (0.0012s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.101
Host is up (0.00063s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.104
Host is up (0.040s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.108
Host is up (0.00068s latency).
Nmap done: 61 IP addresses (5 hosts up) scanned in 1.66 seconds

Interpret the output:

So what this tells me is that those IP addresses listed were the only ones responding to pings. I can eyeball each one and say, aha, the 192.168.13.101 is my missing wireless bridge. Entering that ip address in a browser brings up the username/login of that router acting as bridge."
Guest [Entry]

Go to main router(connecting from the client-bridge), locate the dhcp table and find the mac addr of the client-bridge. But you cannot ping it. In short, it looks like to a virtual IP addr.