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How to find virtual memory size and cache size of a linux system?

How to find virtual memory size and cache size of a linux system?

Is there any command to get virtual memory size, cache size and front side bus speed of a linux system? Is swap in linux same as virtual memory?

Asked by: Guest | Views: 97
Total answers/comments: 5
Guest [Entry]

"This question is completely contained in your previous question How to find virtual memory size and cache size of a linux system?. As pointed out in my answer to that question, the sudo dmidecode --type processor command gives you the ""External Clock"" speed, and FSB speed is a multiple (typically 2 or 4 times) of this speed.

If this did not work for you, you should edit your original question and tell us what output you got or what the error was. The more specific you are, the better others can help you.

As pointed out by The Journeyman geek, you can typically get the same ""External Clock"" measure from lshw, in the value reported for ""clock"" in the cpu related ouput.

*-cpu
description: CPU
product: Genuine Intel® CPU T2300 @ 1.66GHz
vendor: Intel Corp.
physical id: 400
bus info: cpu@0
version: 6.14.8
serial: 0000-06E8-0000-0000-0000-0000
slot: Microprocessor
size: 1GHz
capacity: 1800MHz
width: 32 bits
clock: 133MHz
capabilities: fpu fpu_exception wp vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx constant_tsc arch_perfmon bts pni monitor est tm2 xtpr pdcm cpufreq
configuration: id=0

Finally, you may find the external clock speed in the output of dmesg, though this is by no means a standard way of accessing this information. You may find the FSB speed via your BIOS settings, or by looking up your CPU spec, though these are not linux specific."
Guest [Entry]

I do believe lshw has that info. However not all distros have it (hint- next time PLEASE mention what distro and version you use. It helps a lot. Also helps to be specific about what you did so far. 'some command like' is not good enough)
Guest [Entry]

"vmstat

vmstat reports report virtual memory statistics, which has information about processes, swap, free, buffer and cache memory, paging space, disk IO activity, traps, interrupts, context switches and CPU activity. With vmstat command, administrators can has instantaneous reports on memory usage.

Syntax of vmstat

vmstat -[options] [delay count]

Example usage of vmstat

vmstat

Found here"
"vmstat

vmstat reports report virtual memory statistics, which has information about processes, swap, free, buffer and cache memory, paging space, disk IO activity, traps, interrupts, context switches and CPU activity. With vmstat command, administrators can has instantaneous reports on memory usage.

Syntax of vmstat

vmstat -[options] [delay count]

Example usage of vmstat

vmstat

Found here"
Guest [Entry]

"The ""free"" command will show you memory utilization, including what's actually being used vs what's in buffers / cache.

# free
total used free shared buffers cached
Mem: 3896252 3779044 117208 0 65788 1363972
-/+ buffers/cache: 2349284 1546968
Swap: 2097144 886836 1210308

The ""dmidecode"" command might give you some insight into the FSB speed."
Guest [Entry]

"swapon -s

The used field will indicate the amount currently in use

Filename Type Size Used Priority
/dev/sda5 partition 859436 0 -1"