Home » Questions » Computers [ Ask a new question ]

What is the recommended boot partition size for Windows 7?

What is the recommended boot partition size for Windows 7?

I started using one big partition for everything and separating data out with folders when I got my current computer years ago. I'm preparing to upgrade my system from Windows XP to Windows 7, and I thought I might go back to putting my data on a separate partition.

Asked by: Guest | Views: 81
Total answers/comments: 5
Guest [Entry]

"I've done half a dozen Windows 7 installs this week and the ""base"" install takes nearly 20 GB in my experience. I'm writing post this on my new Windows 7 Ultimate rig. I've installed literally nothing but drivers and 20 GB is used up already on my OS partition.

This is also confirmed by the Windows 7 System Requirements, which also lists that you need 20 GB at least to run Windows 7. So, I would recommend you to use at least 60 GB and to install your applications in a separate data partition.

Note that your system partition tends to grow over time due to updates, temporary files, logs and that kind of things; so, to anticipate this you would need sufficient space. If you look at other answers, you will see that some people have 40 or 50 GB so choosing 60 GB makes sure that you don't hit the border yet.

Given the hard disk sizes nowadays, 10 - 20 GB more shouldn't hurt. Unless you run a SSD..."
Guest [Entry]

"Primary partition is created on the outer track of the hard drive waffle, which makes the overall data read/write much faster then un-partitioned drive (google it). Its not about just ""flexibility"" or ""content management"", its about how fast you want your OS or Apps to load, haedrive read/write is a big bottle neck on an un-partitioned drives, and its not a marginal gain in performance, it will make the drive 3-4 times faster depending up on how small you make the partition.

ps. if you don’t know the answer don’t post garbage information like ""The reasons for multiple partitions are not good enough to overcome the hassle"" is misleading and absolutely not true"
Guest [Entry]

It changes due to your needs. For example, if you are a mid-level computer user you need 50 GB. But if you like to install tons of applications you can have 100 GB. Also, it's up to your needs and your total space. For example, I got a hard disk drive of 120 GB and using 55 GB for Windows Vista Home Premium.
Guest [Entry]

"Well, it IS true that separate partition for the OS equals better performance. If you could have a separate HDD physically it'd be even better, but there'a also a balance to be maintained - balance of size. Too big and your HDD's read-writes will slow down the PC performance. Too small and your OS will eat the space too quickly.

I personally have Windows 7 Ultimate installed on a separate partition which is 35 GB and it worked well for me for almost two years now, but it starts to overgrow this amount of space... There is only 2.37 GB of free space left and my Windows directory weights 22.2 GB now (and growing) so while the recommendation of 60 GB is a bit excessive, I'd recommend 40-50 GB. Although you could buy a cheap 80 GB HDD and dedicate it only for the OS..."
Guest [Entry]

Having been in this same predicament recently, I can say that the advice on here already is about right. It's amazing that you can have a fully loaded Windows XP PC on a handful of GB, but Windows 7 not so. I really wouldn't recommend a minimum of less than 50 GB, 60 GB would be better as you'll have some extra room for the future. Less than that, you'll notice a pinch not long after your new install.