Home » Questions » Computers [ Ask a new question ]

Why create a link like this: ln -nsf?

Why create a link like this: ln -nsf?

What does this do?

Asked by: Guest | Views: 78
Total answers/comments: 3
Guest [Entry]

"From the BSD man page:

-f If the target file already exists, then unlink it so that the link
may occur. (The -f option overrides any previous -i options.)

-n If the target_file or target_dir is a symbolic link, do not follow
it. This is most useful with the -f option, to replace a symlink
which may point to a directory."
Guest [Entry]

"Here are all the options to ln. You'll find -n and -f in here.

-F If the target file already exists and is a directory, then remove
it so that the link may occur.
The -F option should be used with either -f or -i options. If
none is specified, -f is implied.
The -F option is a no-op unless -s option is specified.

-h If the target_file or target_dir is a symbolic link, do not
follow it. This is most useful with the -f option, to replace
a symlink which may point to a directory.

-f If the target file already exists, then unlink it so that the
link may occur. (The -f option overrides any previous -i options.)

-i Cause ln to write a prompt to standard error if the target file
exists. If the response from the standard input begins with the
character `y' or `Y', then unlink the target file so that the link
may occur. Otherwise, do not attempt the link. (The -i option
overrides any previous -f options.)

-n Same as -h, for compatibility with other ln implementations.

-s Create a symbolic link.

-v Cause ln to be verbose, showing files as they are processed."
Guest [Entry]

"-f says that if the target of your command is an existing file, it should be removed and replaced by the new link. (Note that in Unix-influenced systems, ""file"" can include directories, links, pipes, etc.)

-n modifies -f, saying that if the target you specify is an existing symbolic link, it should not be removed."