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No power or display

No power or display

I'm not getting any power from the unit. No display either. It's just dead. Any suggestions?

ANSWERS:

"Cause 1

Line Fuse

If too much current passes through the microwave circuitry, the line fuse will blow. If the line fuse blows, the microwave won’t start. To determine if the line fuse is at fault, use a multimeter to test it for continuity. If the fuse does not have continuity, replace it. In addition, you should investigate and resolve the problem that caused the fuse to blow. If you don’t resolve the underlying issue, the new fuse will blow too. (Caution: The microwave oven can store thousands of volts of electricity in its high voltage capacitor, even after the microwave oven has been unplugged. Due to the potential for electric shock, it is extremely dangerous to replace the electronic components in a microwave. Only a licensed technician should replace the line fuse.)

Cause 2

Main Control Board

The main control board might be defective. However, this is rarely the case. Control boards are often misdiagnosed—check all of the more commonly defective parts. If you have determined that all of the other components are working properly,replace the main control board. (Caution: The microwave oven can store thousands of volts of electricity in its high voltage capacitor, even after the microwave oven has been unplugged. Due to the potential for electric shock, it is extremely dangerous to replace the electronic components in a microwave. Only a licensed technician should replace the main control board.)

Cause 3

Thermal Fuse

The thermal fuse cuts off power to the microwave if the microwave overheats. To determine if the thermal fuse has blown, use a multimeter to test it for continuity. If the fuse does not have continuity, replace it. The thermal fuse cannot be reset—if the fuse is blown, it must be replaced. (Caution: The microwave oven can store thousands of volts of electricity in its high voltage capacitor, even after the microwave oven has been unplugged. Due to the potential for electric shock, it is extremely dangerous to replace the electronic components in a microwave. Only a licensed technician should replace the thermal fuse.)"

"I am a licensed electronic technician with 30+ years experience. I recently had a GE over the range microwave fail..no power. It is plugged into a dedicated outlet. Model JVM3160FS3SS.

I opened the unit to discover a blown main fuse. This is a 20 Amp fast-blow standard glass fuse. A search for a replacement fuse at the GE parts website was startling!

All parts for this microwave are priced out of this world. The fuse costs 50+ dollars for one piece, whereas general electronic suppliers sell these in 5-packs for under 10 dollars. GE won’t even sell you the magnetron tube, but third party sellers will for 260+ dollars. Heck, the replacement fan motor will cost you 340+ dollars.

The lesson here: This microwave is not economically repairable. A new unit with 1 year warranty sells for $199."

"All the answers here are wrong especially when the microwave is new I don’t think these people answering are understanding the question but I do because I had the same problem!!

It's not the actual microwave itself that is the problem here people it's the outlet we’re plugging it into. You can Google it addressing the outlet not the microwave because my GFCI (the reset button on your kitchen outlet) kept popping out when I would plug it in realizing it’s not the actual microwave mine went on when I finally found the right outlet. However if you live in an apartment and it is two bedroom and up you have an outlet that can handle it, so go find it!! ... HOWEVER, if you have a one bedroom or smaller you will not have an outlet for that microwave and you must have a ""Licensed Electrician"" come over and switch out the outlet from a 15 amp to 20 amp it will take 5 minutes but don't have anyone else or yourself being unlicensed try doing it to save a few dollars because whoever it is they will die from being fried from the inside out aka ELECTROCUTED!!! It's inevitable THE PERSON MUST BE A ""LICENSED ELECTRICIAN"" PERIOD !"

Banging on the side by the control panel also works on my jvm3160rf5ss. I’m confused cause the ge repair video calls a part a thermal fuse. GE lists no such part but calls it a thermostat. I took that part out and it tested bad, but then I read while ordering said part, it’s a thermostat and will test bad as a fuse. I put the part back in and presto the microwave worked. That lasted three days. Soo, researching this again I read about smacking it on the side. It’s working again , for now???

"I could not help noticing no one has addressed the safety micro switches that may still be used in this modern age (fixed a lot of them in my time ) . ‘Micro’ is a misnomer , they are large enough to spot easily . They are in the door latch assembly . Could be as many as 4 involved .

A smack to the side of an oven causing it to work points to a problem in the safety function of the door . I would use a meter to confirm function of a switch , taking note of the contacts being N.O. (normal open ) or N.C. making the switch operate to measure N.O. contacts can be awkward …DO NOT do this plugged in… Now , the door switch mechanism can get worn and nothing you can do apart from building up worn cams or such will work . That case is not to be bothered with , send to recycle .

However new(ish) units may have a bad switch but strange readings may require you need to disconnect at least one lead from a suspect switch . Getting some switches out can be a mechanical puzzle HEAVY FORCE should NOT be needed . LOW resistance is absolutely required for a reading . If a contact shows anything above a small fraction of an ohm it should go in the bin . There can be a lot of current flowing and needs to have a low impediment to that . More modern units maybe not and can get by with slight resistance BUT normally should be as close to zero as can be . On older units I have seen blowing main fuse (usually a ceramic 15 amp,confirm blown with meter) caused by bad switches only .

PLAY SAFE …let unit sit for a few minutes after unplug before grabbing things , that large cap CAN be lethal . Pay no heed to Eansor’s coment about 110volt being nothing , YES you can use a finger to detect live wire BUT there are cases of people’s muscles getting locked and you CANNOT let go . If you have heavy calloused fingers not much current would flow and get away with it . NOT the case if you grab 2000 volt charged cap .

Just some thoughts … pardon the long-winded reply .

Hugh"

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