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Execute "Get Info" on a file from command line in Mac OS X

Execute "Get Info" on a file from command line in Mac OS X

How would you get the "Get Info" window to appear from command line as you would if you were in Finder and hit Command-I? I could write it in applescript... but I stay away if I can.

Asked by: Guest | Views: 102
Total answers/comments: 2
Guest [Entry]

"Here is my updated version of the script (including attribution to the original source, as I found it a couple of years ago). The main change in functionality is that it will handle pathnames that include characters that are not encoded identically between MacRoman and UTF-8 (anything outside ASCII).

#!/bin/sh
# Requires a POSIX-ish shell.

#
# Originally From: http://hayne.net/MacDev/Bash/show_getinfo
#

# show_getinfo
# This script opens the Finder's ""Get Info"" window
# for the file or folder specified as a command-line argument.
# Cameron Hayne (macdev@hayne.net) March 2003

# Chris Johnsen <chris_johnsen@pobox.com> August 2007, December 2009
# Include Unicode path in AppleScript code via ""utxt"" block(s).
# Handle case where cwd ends in newline.

utf8_to_AppleScript_utxt() {
o=""$(printf '\302\253')"" # UTF-8 LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
c=""$(printf '\302\273')"" # UTF-8 RIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
# AppleScript utxt:
# <http://lists.apple.com/archives/applescript-implementors/2007/Mar/msg00024.html>
# <<data utxtXXXX>> where
# << is actually U+00AB LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
# >> is actually U+00BB RIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
# XXXX are the hex digits of UTF-16 code units
# If a BOM is present, it specifies the byte order.
# The BOM code point will not be a part of the resulting string value.
# If no BOM is present, the byte order interpreted as native.
# The iconv invocation below *MUST*
# include a BOM
# or produce native byte ordering
# or include a BOM and produce native byte ordering.
# In my testing, iconv to UTF-16 includes a BOM and uses native ordering.
iconv -f UTF-8 -t UTF-16 |
( printf '("""" as Unicode text'
hexdump -ve ""\"" & ${o}data utxt\"" 63/2 \""%04x\"" \""$c\""""
printf ')\n' ) |
sed -e 's/ *\('""$c""')\)$/\1/'
}

scriptname=""${0##*/}""
if test ""$#"" -lt 1; then
printf ""usage: %s file-or-folder\n"" ""$scriptname""
exit 1
fi

if ! test -e ""$1""; then
printf ""%s: No such file or directory: %s\n"" ""$scriptname"" ""$1""
exit 2
fi

if test ""${1#/}"" = ""$1""; then set -- ""$PWD/$1""; fi

set -- ""$(printf %s ""$1"" | utf8_to_AppleScript_utxt)""

# 10.4 requires script text to be in the primary encoding (usually MacRoman)
# 10.5+ supports UTF-8, UTF-16 and the primary encoding
(iconv -f UTF-8 -t MACROMAN | osascript -) <<EOF
set macpath to POSIX file $1 as alias
tell app ""Finder"" to open information window of macpath
EOF"
Guest [Entry]

I know that I am not truly answering your question, but I get alot of the info I need from using ls -l and the file command.