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"You are a research scientist. You are growing body parts and organs in the lab. First you grew some simple body parts like ears and noses.

"You are a research scientist. You are growing body parts and organs in the lab. First you grew some simple body parts like ears and noses. Then you tried bladders and blood vessels. You were successful! Now you want to try a heart! Your colleagues say it cannot be done because A) the heart must move and it is not possible to make an organ that moves. B) the heart is a pump made of muscle and that is difficult to grow in the lab. C) the heart is made up of so many different types of cells that are organized into many tissues. D) human hearts are not like any other animal hearts so there is not source for cells and tissues."

Asked by: Guest | Views: 79
Total answers/comments: 1
Guest [Entry]

"Answer:

The closest answer to this question is b) the heart is a pump made of muscle and that is difficult it grow in the lab.

The main difficulty that scientists have in growing the heart in a laboratory setting is making the heart behave the way it does. Scientists have been able to grow a heart complete with all the blood vessels, but as of this writing, they have not been able to make it beat like a normal heart.

They are currently studying this aspect, and at the rate that they're going, it won't be long before a fully functional lab grown heart will be transplanted and save somebody's life.

3D Printed Heart

This question is not updated because in 2019, scientists in Israel had some success replicating the heart, complete with veins, etc.  Below is an excerpt from the Medical News Today:

A group of scientists from Tel Aviv University in Israel has taken this work one step further and moved cardiac tissue engineering to the next stage.

Their first step was to take a biopsy of fatty tissue from the patient; then, they separated cellular material from noncellular material.

The researchers reprogrammed the cells of the fatty tissue to become pluripotent stem cells, which can develop into the range of cell types necessary to grow a heart.

The noncellular material consists of structural components, such as glycoproteins and collagen; the scientists modified these to turn them into a ""bioink.""

Then, they mixed this bioink with the stem cells. The cells differentiated into cardiac or endothelial cells (which line blood vessels), which the scientists could use to create cardiac patches, including blood vessels.

The crucial next task, as Prof. Dvir says, is to teach them to behave like hearts; he explains that they ""need to develop the printed heart further. The cells need to form a pumping ability; they can currently contract, but we need them to work together.""

Growing Heart Muscles

Furthermore, in 2020, Scientists in Japan has successfully grown heart muscles in the lab and have successfully transplanted it to a person. Below is an excerpt from that story:

To grow the heart muscle cells, the team started with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These are stem cells that researchers create by taking an adult's cells - often from their skin or blood - and reprogramming them back into their embryonic-like pluripotent state.

At that point, researchers can coax the iSP cells into becoming whatever kind of cell they'd like. In the case of this Japanese study, the researchers created heart muscle cells from the iSP cells before placing them on small sheets.

Learn more about the heart: brainly.ph/question/682663

Learn more about heart disease: brainly.ph/question/198992

Learn more about heart attack: brainly.ph/question/58688"